Can you really have too much of a good thing?  For example, have you ever eaten too much – like a whole box of cookies – and found yourself regretting it?  Food is just one example.  But, fraudsters can sometimes have too much of a good thing too – they don’t know when enough stealing is enough.  According to an Arkansas Business article, one Alabama couple found their tax refund fraud scam was too much of a good thing and were “taxed out” for the season.

Tax season, usually peaking in the early spring, is a testing time for accountants and fraudsters alike. With the creation of tax software, the ease of submitting your own taxes has brought along a more convenient ease for defrauding the U.S. government. (It’s an exhausting time for those of us stopping and preventing such frauds too!) The hard work of investigators paid off when an Alabama couple pleaded guilty to filing a false claim, stealing refund money and identity theft, all stemming from tax software-fueled fraud.  The couple faces 10 years in prison each, as well as fines of up to $250,000.  In addition, the husband of the dynamic duo faces a mandatory two years for aggravated identity theft, against his son. (All families have their issues, but a couple that steals their son’s identity to commit fraud may need to talk things out.) But, how much became “too much of a good thing” for the daring and defrauding duo?

During the plea agreement, the husband admitted that both he and his wife prepared around 200 bogus income tax returns using the names, birth dates and Social Security numbers of other people.  Out of those 200 false tax returns, they received money for 56.  (That’s a 28% success rate.  Was this really a good thing for them?) The couple took the money from the 56 “successful” fraudulent returns and placed it in a bank account that was opened in the name of the wife’s son. The couple had “too much of their good thing” when investigators tallied their theft to $132,000 in their fraudulent tax refunds.

Now that I think about it, a box full of cookies isn’t nearly as bad as owing $132,000 plus fines and jail time to the U.S. government.  But here is a thought provoking question:  “Can catching too many fraudsters be too much of a good thing?”

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