Doubling Down on Fraud

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You can’t collect unemployment benefits if you are working. You also can’t collect unemployment benefits if you’re in prison. (Although many incarcerated people have jobs or roles in prison, they are unquestionably not available for employment by Department of Labor methodology.) Yet the Patriot Ledger reports that one man in Weymouth, Massachusetts thought otherwise, and collected more than $40,000 in unemployment benefits while incarcerated. (Even though he wasn’t able to look for work, he was able to look for ways to defraud taxpayers and the government.)

The story states that the man pleaded guilty to 64 counts of unemployment fraud and one count of larceny over $250 (I guess the larceny event occurred because $40,000 in stolen unemployment benefits was not enough.) Apparently, the fraudster applied for and began receiving unemployment benefits after losing his job; however, while in prison for more than a year, he continued to collect the benefits illegally. In fact, while in prison he or someone working on his behalf wrongly certified that he was unemployed, able to work, and actively looking for a job. (The Attorney General’s Office received an anonymous tip.)

Sweetening this story, when the fraudster was sentenced for falsely collecting unemployment benefits, the article explains that he was already serving a three year probationary sentence. (I wonder if one of the things that impeded this fraudster’s job search were his frequent run-ins with the law.) According to the article, he will serve a two-year suspended jail sentence, repay the government $28,496 in restitution and complete 200 hours of community service.

Source: Today’s ”Fraud of the Day” is based on an article titled, ”Weymouth man admits collecting $40,000 in unemployment benefits while in jail,” written as a Staff Report and published by The Patriot Ledger on October 19, 2015.

WEYMOUTH – A Weymouth man was given a suspended sentence of two years in jail for fraudulently collecting more than $40,000 in unemployment benefits while in jail.

Colin Glynn, 45, pleaded guilty Thursday to 64 counts of unemployment fraud and one count of larceny over $250. Suffolk Superior Court Judge Peter Krupp suspended the sentence for a three year probationary term and ordered Glynn to pay $28,496 in restitution and complete 200 hours of community service.

Prosecutors said that Glynn applied for and began receiving unemployment benefits after losing a job in December 2010.

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Larry Benson
Larry Benson is currently the Director of Strategic Alliances for Revenue Discovery and Recovery at LexisNexis Risk Solutions. In this role, Benson is responsible for developing partnerships for the tax and revenue and child support enforcement verticals. He focuses on embedded companies that have a need for third-party analytics to enhance their current offerings.