Job + Unemployment Benefits = Fraud

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21610268 - woman taking some letters from mailbox

It’s a good day to have a job. If you know someone who has lost a job – and chances are you do – or have been in that situation yourself, you know what I mean. The most immediate impact of being unemployed, of course, is the lack of a paycheck. How will you pay your bills? Buy groceries? Or take care of your family? That’s where unemployment benefits come in. Requirements for unemployment program eligibility differ by state. But one thing is certain? you have to be unemployed to receive unemployment benefits; otherwise, you’re probably committing fraud – and you probably know it.

Today’s fraud is based on a WISHTV.com article about an Indianapolis woman who recently pleaded guilty to unemployment insurance fraud. The story is a simple one? she had a job and she filed for unemployment benefits anyway. How was she caught? Fortunately, the state of Indiana has a check in place to catch fraudsters? the state ”sends employers a notice documenting their charges for former employees’ unemployment benefits.’? (Whoops…guess the gig is up.)

Now, she’s really looking for cash – specifically the $46,115 (plus penalties) she was ordered to pay back the state. (Wonder if they will ever see a penny? I’m hoping they do so it can go to deserving individuals.? She ”also will serve two years on probation and must complete 100 hours of community service.” (My opinion: she should be in prison.)

Source: Today’s ”Fraud of the Day” is based on an article entitled, ”Woman owes state $46K after unemployment fraud,” published by WISHTV.com on February 29, 2012.

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – An Indianapolis woman who admitted collecting unemployment insurance while she was working full-time now owes the state $46,115 plus penalties.

The Department of Workforce said Eva Sloan, 32, Indianapolis, pleaded guilty to unemployment insurance fraud. The guilty plea ended an investigation began when Sloan’s employer protested a charge for her unemployment benefits. Each month, DWD sends employers a notice documenting their charges for former employees’ unemployment insurance benefits.

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