Missouri Businessman with Significant Income Charged with Unemployment Fraud

10

It’s not easy being in the fraud business today; apparently, there are tabs to run up in bars by fraudsters – those have to be paid! There are checks to cash and then there are the fraudsters’ vacations to Costa Rica – which aren’t cheap! Good luck finding a round-trip flight from Lambert-St. Louis International to San Jose for anything less than $700 these days!

And so is it any surprise that a veteran businessman—57 years old—should need a few extra bucks every now and then? Maybe $44,670 bucks? No, no surprise at all…though James L. Quirin may have been surprised when he was charged in federal court last month with theft of government funds to that exact amount.

According to the St. Louis-Post Dispatch, Quirin—a businessman of ”significant income”—allegedly applied for unemployment benefits in Illinois. Well…if someone has a job based in Missouri and not in Illinois, then that same person is likely un-employed in Illinois. Just as that same person was un-employed in Hawaii, and Florida, and South Dakota – heck, there were 49 other states to be employed in! That is how the system works, isn’t it?

This story is fascinating not only because it’s so outrageous, but also because it actually underscores an important fact: those who try to cheat the system often do it by exploiting the seams between two jurisdictions.

So the question of the day is…how much incentive do government agencies need to start leveraging public records across state boundaries to detect fraud?

Source: Today’s ”Fraud of the Day” is based on an article entitled, ”Missouri Businessman Accused of Unemployment Fraud,” by Robert Patrick published by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sept. 29, 2011.

East St. Louis – A Missouri businessman was charged in federal court here Thursday with theft of government funds and accused of stealing $44,670 in Illinois unemployment benefits, the U.S. Attorney’s office said.

James L. Quirin, 57, of Manchester, was a businessman earning ”significant income” but applied for unemployment benefits in Illinois anyway, a Department of Labor investigation said.

Read More